Utilizing continuous glucose monitoring in primary care practice: What the numbers mean

Published:November 28, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2020.10.013

      Highlights

      • Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) improves clinical outcomes in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
      • Retrospective analysis of CGM data facilitates decision making and therapy adjustments.
      • The article provides practical guidance for utilizing CGM data in clinical practice settings.

      Abstract

      Use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been shown to improve glycemia control, reduce hypoglycemia, lower glycemic variability and enhance quality of life for individuals with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, many primary care physicians may be unfamiliar with the how CGM data can interpreted and acted upon. As adoption of this technology continues to grow, primary care physicians will be challenged to integrate CGM into their clinical practices. This article is intended to provide clinicians with practical guidance in interpreting and utilizing CGM data with their patients.

      Keywords

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