Continuous glucose monitoring in primary care practice: Beside numbers

Published:September 28, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2021.09.008
      It was very useful to read the manuscript “Utilizing continuous glucose monitoring in primary care practice: What the numbers mean” written by Edelman et al. [
      • Edelman S.V.
      • Santos Cavaiola T.
      • Boeder S.
      • Pettusc J.
      Utilizing continuous glucose monitoring in primary care practice: what the numbers mean.
      ]. During the time of pandemic future is getting unpredictable. Two important issues that are not going to disappear are healthcare and technology. The positive outcome of interaction between health and technology is showing that innovative technological solutions are needed, and, as claimed in the paper, primary care physicians (PCP) will be challenged to integrate it into their clinical practices. One of such technologies is professional continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) which provides retrospective data of glucose values. Since there are few studies conducted in primary care (even less showing attitudes towards such technology), we decided to share our own experience. We involved 20 PCP who recruited 100 patients with type 2 diabetes. Beside analysing the benefit of tracking patterns of glucose values we evaluated observations and opinions of both patients and physicians regarding use of this device. Patients mainly reported fear (88%), disturbance (80%) and discomfort (68%) in everyday routine. We found no significance among patients' answers regarding their indication for CGM (all p’s > 0.05). Physicians reported that the selection of patients was very challenging or challenging in 60% of cases and the education was very challenging or challenging in 70% of cases while in only 20% of cases they found data transfer very challenging or challenging. However, in only 10% of cases they believed that CMG was associated with better health care, i.e. in 15% of cases with better control of diabetes. Analysis of physician's answers regarding their age, working experience and total number of patients in care revealed no significant difference (all p’s > 0.05).
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      Reference

        • Edelman S.V.
        • Santos Cavaiola T.
        • Boeder S.
        • Pettusc J.
        Utilizing continuous glucose monitoring in primary care practice: what the numbers mean.
        Prim. Care Diabetes. 2021; 15: 199-207